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Found the Limitations of Tumblr

In my never ending quest to explore, experiment and gain experience with getting my content in front of users on their favorite social media platforms, you may recall that I created a Tumblr blog. The initial account, and the main blog, started out as a blog about sports, which quickly got moved over to what is now my WordPress Sports blog.

The rationale behind going to my own blog was the desire to do more than I could with just Tumblr, especially since Tumblr does not really appear to be a platform that many people not using Tumblr ever, ever look at. I created a sub blog for photography at the time, that also became my photo blog, for the same reason.

I did, however, decide to leave those blogs intact, and push out the WordPress posts to them, based on my comments at the beginning of this post. If you’re a Tumblr user, I want you to be able to see and interact with me on your chosen social network.

Unfortunately, one of the limitations of Tumblr is how it works with sub-blogs, or secondary blogs. My main account was the sports blog, but the photo blog was my sub, or secondary blog, for that account. That works out well enough when you are publishing, but it can be very limiting from an interactions stand point. The problem is that when you “follow” or like anything from other Tumblrs, only your main blog profile shows up. That made it really difficult to interact with the photographer community over there, and Tumblr does not support switching your secondary blog into a main blog, or handing it over to another user as anything but their secondary blog. This didn’t really work as I had hoped.

So, after some research, I created a whole new profile, with a new photo blog on Tumblr. Continue reading

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This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Glenn Greenwald on Why Privacy Matters

I love his response to anyone who suggests that we don’t need privacy if we aren’t doing anything wrong. OK, go ahead and email me the passwords to ALL of your email accounts so I can troll through, read what I want, publish what I find interesting, etc.

Also note the way people like Eric Schmidt and Mark Zuckerburg, while claiming that privacy doesn’t matter for you, go to great lengths to protect theirs.

Privacy matters. We have the right to be secure in our persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures for a reason. The government should have to provide a reason to invade your privacy, you should not have to provide a reason why they should not. This is why the government’s argument against encryption is so important, and backwards.

h/t to Lifehacker for the video.

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FBI Director James Comey Gets Phone Encryption Completely Wrong

Watching 60 Minutes tonight, and in an interview with FBI Director James Comey, he compared Apple and Google’s plans to encrypt phones by default to having car trunks that can never be opened or houses that can never be entered, even with a court order.

Except his comparisons are completely and utterly incorrect. Law enforcement, even with a court order, still requires me to open the trunk, or open the door to my house for them to conduct their search. What they want with mobile devices is the equivalent of having a key to every single house in the country and freedom to enter them without your knowledge. No, I’m sorry, you don’t get to have that.

If law enforcement has a court order to search a seized phone, then it can be presented to the owner and they can be required to enter their passcode. Why is that so hard? Why does the government need access to decrypt personal data on mobile devices without the involvement of the owners of that data?

No. No. No!

 

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This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Marriott Gets Caught Blocking Mobile Hot Spots

My new toy

As a card carrying Gold level Marriott customer, the wifi situation has always been a source of confusion for me. When I travel for work or personal reasons, I generally stay in the lower end Marriott properties, the Residence Inn, Fairfield Inn and Suites, etc. Those rooms usually come with free wifi.

The more expensive properties, however, charge for wifi. That makes no sense to me, especially when the typical business traveler would have a mobile hot spot anyway. (I have one for my work travel).

On the other hand, if you block mobile hot spots, you can force customers into paying for your wifi, couldn’t you?

They can claim to be trying to protect their network and customers from rogue devices but at the end of the day isn’t that the point of the hot spot? When I just want to surf the web easily, I can connect to the hotel wifi, when I need to do some work, or access some more secured sites, I can connect to my mobile hot spot, use a VPN connection, and not be a target for the other people on the hotel’s wifi network. Best of both worlds, right?

I really don’t enjoy paying more for a room, and for wifi on top of that. Not very nice, Marriott.

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If You Manage Others You Are “Them”

I’ve written before about Manager Tools. Specifically I’ve written before about how you are the company to the people who report to you, and all that entails.

Over the last couple of weeks on the Manager Tools podcast they’ve released parts 1 and 2 of Welcome To They – Professional Subordination

In their own words:

You’re in your boss’s office, and he tells you that his budget has been cut and your team will have to give up 3 of its 10 members. Or, she says that there’s a new project that supersedes yours, and all of your team’s work won’t be needed or used, and they’ll transition to other work. Or, he says, sorry, but the pitch you and one of your teams made was denied.

Sure, you’re disappointed. Frustrated. But what really matters is what you’re going to tell your team. Because you have to support the decision without complaint, publicly and privately.

Welcome to They.

These two casts really brought home the idea of being the organization to the people who work for you, because the examples they gave were things that I’ve seen over and over again in the 25 or so years that I’ve worked in various industries and jobs. I can’t even begin to count the number of times I’ve had bosses express frustration, bewilderment or simply ignorance about decisions being made by the management team that they are part of! Each time it has happened, I’ve never been able to put my finger on exactly why, but I’ve always left with a feeling that maybe I should do something else. After listening to the Manager Tools guys talk about it, I can suddenly put my finger on it.

If you are my boss and your message to me is that you’re unhappy with a decision, or that you don’t know what is going on or why, my first instinct is to not want to work for this organization any longer. After all, if the management of the company can’t even get on the same page, why should I invest my future here when I can go somewhere else? Your job is not to commiserate with me, it’s to convince me that this is the correct decision for the organization and what the plan is to move forward. Your reports can’t move forward if you don’t.

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This Week’s Links (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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